Safety First

Bus Safety is Everyone’s Responsibility

School buses are the safest mode of transportation for getting children back and forth to school. School buses are designed to be safer than passenger vehicles in avoiding crashes and preventing injury. School buses keep an annual estimated 17.3 million cars off roads surrounding schools each year.

Every September Jayne Cuff, one of our favorite bus drivers, visits Kindergarten for a bus safety demonstration. Using a chalk line drawn ten feet from the bus, Mrs. Cuff explains safety rules and regulations, noting that students are not visible inside that line! Each student has the opportunity to sit in the driver’s seat and experience that “blind spot”. Having the students see for themselves the safety rules in action leaves a lasting impression that will not soon be forgotten.   — Mrs. Anne Baehr

 

School Bus Safety Tips for Parents and Children

Waiting for the bus

  • Be on time
  • Stand back and wait for the doors to open

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Riding the bus

  • Stay seated
  • Keep yourself and your belongings inside the window
  • Listen to, and obey, the bus driver

Getting off the bus

  • Exit carefully and use the handrails
  • Stand where the bus driver can see you
  • Watch and wait for the bus driver’s signal before crossing
  • Get the bus driver’s OK before retrieving dropped items

 

Beware of THE DANGER ZONE

dangerzone-2

The Danger Zone is the area on all sides of the bus where children are in the most danger of being hit. Children should stay ten feet away from the bus (or as far away as they can) and never go behind it. They should take five giant steps in front of the bus before crossing, so they can be seen by the driver.

 

School Bus Safety Tips For Drivers

Get to Know Your Students.
Smile and greet them by name each time they get on your bus.

Be a Positive Role Model.
Be friendly and polite. Say “please” and “thank you.” Show students the kind of behavior you would like to see from them.

Respect Students’ Personal Space.
Students have little personal space on a school bus. If you must approach a student, remain at least one leg-length away.

Be Aware of Your Body Language.
Avoid gestures, facial expressions, or movements that may appear threatening, such as scowls or finger pointing.

Establish Rules.
Keep your rules short and simple. Give a written copy to all riders and post them on the bus.

Set Limits When Rules Are Broken.
Tell the student what rule was broken and why that rule is important. Then, set limits by giving the student choices and explaining the consequences of each choice. Stress the choice you prefer the student to make.

Remain Calm.
Even when students are insulting or hostile, don’t allow them to “push your buttons.” Your losing control will only make the situation worse.